Writing

Outsourcing the Blog: You Are Your Own Brand

With little Kory now home for over two weeks, and me getting back to my normal day jobs, I've been keeping an eye open on freelance writing opportunities online through various websites, and I see a lot for blog writers. It made me think: keeping a regular blog has always been difficult for me. Could I just outsource it? Hire other writers to do their own series or posts on the Experience Points blog? It would be easier for me, for sure.

Image source: icandy-graphics.com

Image source: icandy-graphics.com

This topic was, to my delight, discussed in the latest episode of The Gaming Careers Podcast, and a point of view was brought up which made me decide not to outsource my blog.

You are your own brand. 

In this day and age, we independents are not always looking for lifelong careers within the gaming industry, or looking to breakout as a full-time author. It could happen, but it takes time and effort. Lots of effort.

Your own effort. 

I know that in order to garner interest and gain followers, I need content. But if I outsource that content, am I gaining followers? Sure, they'll come to the Experience Points blog, but it isn't because of me. And when I try to connect with those readers, it won't be the same connection as to those who found me because of what I wrote.

I've decided to start writing novellas instead of 100k+ word novels, in order to get more content out there faster. I've decided my new RPG will release piecemeal as a collection of small, easy to consume documents rather than one giant omnibus, simply to ensure that my content gets out there. Breaking my big projects into bite-sized chunks helps me, shows my customers that I can and will put out work, and will slowly build my own community.

It's easy to get caught in a rut where I check my site's visits, check my trafficking. How am I doing today? Did people read today's post or watch today's video? How do I get more? But that's not the point. As easy as it is to measure traffic and views and clicks, I'm not where that is what matters most. What matters most right now are the posts themselves, the releases and the videos and the process and the content.

And the occasionacomment helps, too. But if I really want to cultivate my audience, I have to give them something to follow. And that has to be ME.