pirates

Writing

Pay Attention to your Creative Voice

Astral Tides: The Shadows of Uhmakhet is the first sequel I’ve set in place with the intent to publish. While I have written sequels before, it was years before self-publishing was ever even a thought or belief I had in mind, ever before it was even known to me, let alone considered achievable. The Shadows of Uhmakhet is also my second foray into the universe of the Council, the Union, and, more importantly, the crew of Captain Daltir Stone.

Rimward ended on more of a cliffhanger than any other book I’ve written thus far. And my plans with the story and the series was to make it huge. Six books, at minimum, cataloging the events of Captain Daltir Stone’s life from the first page of Rimward all the way to the final book. And if I decided to take it further, then I would, and if I decided to do spin-offs, then I would. Somewhere around episode five of Rimward I was riding high in the clouds on the fervor and excitement of the story, the characters, and the hanging plot threads, and I felt I could run this story for years without ever running out of steam.

And then I started The Shadows of Uhmakhet.

Writing, Video Game News, Round 10

Delightful Distractions: XCOM, Assassin's Creed, & Until Dawn

It has been a difficult few weeks for writing. Where I once knocked out the first episode and a half of Astral Tides: The Shadows of Uhmakhet inside of 10 days, a personal best for me, the events of my life through the month of August have since left me unable to focus long enough to write more than 1000 words at a time. It doesn't matter that I have the entire plot of AT:tSoU meticulously planned out and am already spit-balling ideas for the third book, I still find it hard to sit down and actually write.

So, in an effort to turn label a temporary distraction as lateral progression, I decided to write a blog post, if for nothing else than to give my writing juices that much more of a flow.

I'd be lying if I said that I've been working diligently each day. While an effort has been made every day to sit down and type some words -- any words -- I think it would be dishonest to call it 'diligent work'. So this blog post will be about the various distractions that have been plaguing my mind lately, from revisiting old video games, to new board games, to my own game development.

A couple of weeks after my wedding, my best man arranged to have me kidnapped by a mutual friend and brought to the Twin Cities for a day of tabletop gaming and Minnesota Twins spectating. One of the things we did that day was play a demo version of the XCOM Board Game from Fantasy Flight Games. It's a tabletop adaptation of one of my favorite PS3 games, XCOM: Enemy Unknown. It was simple, tense, and fun, especially once we were running cooperative play with four players. It was so addicting, and offered enough of a challenge that I ordered myself a copy from Amazon a couple days after returning home, and have since been delving into it every few days or so for a solo game here or there (since my wife hasn't felt up to learning another board game).

Single player is a true challenge, since a large part of the game's difficulty rests in the fact that players only have a handful of seconds (never more than 30) to make specific decisions about how to handle the threats that are placed before them. And when you're one player attempting to control all four of the roles in the game, it can become pretty frantic as you throw pieces on the board and hope you didn't go over budget.

Another time-waster I've rediscovered recently is Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag. Though it is almost two years old, I have never beaten it, and I picked it back up a couple of months ago and have made a little progress each week. This is one of the very few games that I actually have a desire to complete 100% of all the side objectives, collectibles and challenges. I've always said that if Rockstar Games made a pirate video game, similar to Red Dead Redemption, I'd be in love. Well, the fact that Ubisoft's own pirate adventure has me so enthralled is a testament to how good it is. And I was a gamer who dropped the AC franchise after the first one, because I got bored in with how repetitive it was (this coming from a guy who plays MMOs seems a little hypocritical, I know).

Finally, the last form of entertainment that has been eating up my time is the new video game that released on PS4, Until Dawn. Now, I'm not actually playing it, since I do not own a PS4, but my wife and I have been watching a play through from our favorite YouTube personalities, Matt and Pat from Two Best Friends Play. It plays out like your typical teen slasher horror flick, with characters and relationships and drama making up the meat of the early game, with some chills and jump scares thrown in to remind you that 'shit will get real at some point'. It's incredibly entertaining and I find myself thoroughly excited to see where it goes in each episode. While Telltale has been own the adventure game corner for quite some time, it's nice to see other companies release their own, original, adventure games that are taking the bar set by Telltale and raising it even more.

But, at some point, I need to get back to my writing, though that may not be in the 4k+ words a day range again until after this next play is over with. I, once again, have found it impossible to say no to community theater, and will be staring in a production of Bill W. And Dr. Bob, a comedic drama about the founding of AA. I enjoy this play, and I am excited to share the stage with this wonderful cast and work with the talented crew.

Until such a time when Astral Tides: The Shadows of Uhmakhet is released, you can always pick up your copy of Astral Tides: Rimward, or even Cybersaurus: The Awakening, from the Kory Stories store!

MMO Monday

MMO Monday - World of Warcraft

The year was 2004. I was a sophomore in high school, and one of my best friends had just picked up the newest Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game, World of Warcraft. We had both been fans of Blizzard's games since the original Warcraft titles, and had played Starcraft (my personal favorite title) countless times together. I went over to his house to see what Blizzard Entertainment's first foray into the MMORPG genre was like, and to determine if it was worth my money.

Fast-forward ten years later, and it is a game I have played on and off again in the last decade (about a fifty-fifty split, as I just returned to playing it after a three year break). World of Warcraft has been incredibly influential in how I write stories, how I interact with an online community, and even how I perceive myself.